Status Quo

Faith-based community could learn from the UH football program

News today lamented season ticket sales for University of Hawaii (UH) football that have hit a 35-year low. Low season ticket sales are one component of a vicious downward spiral for the beleaguered yet beloved football program. Poor season ticket sales lead to lower attendance and less revenue for the cash-strapped program. The lack of funding makes it difficult to lure talent, which leads to a decline in performance. Poor performance leads to fewer season ticket renewals and the cycle repeats.

The question is: “What is the root cause of the program’s decline – losing seasons or the fans not showing up?” Fair-weather fans would note they would come back if the team did better. But a cash-strapped program needs the fans to come back to perform better so they can retain Hawaii’s most talented players.

This apparent catch-22 is the same situation that people of faith face this election season. Already disenfranchised, apathy tempts voters to find better things to do with their time than spending two hours in a cafeteria on a Saturday to cast their vote. These disenfranchised voters say “If government were better, I would go out and vote.”

Government, like the UH Football program, will not change without intervention. The faith-based community chose to take a back seat for the past several elections, only for current elected officials to take over and for the events of the past two years to play out. The list of offenses might include: Pono choices, rampant abuse-of-power, campaign-spending and ethics violations without even mentioning same-sex marriage and the failure of religious freedom legislation. If the faith-based community fail to show up and vote, then they also should not be surprised when the outcome for the next two years is just more of the same.

Is the faith-based community resigned to another losing season, or will they finally step up and buy a season ticket? If they plan to ‘Remember in November’, that campaign starts with the August primary.

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